Belgian Army Uniform 1940

A uniform (walking-out dress) and his field equipment belonging to a Sergeant Segers of the Belgian Army. Sergeant Segers was born in Bretagne near Brussels in 1916 and joined the 1st Regiment of the Line as a private soldier in 1936. On the 22nd September 1939, he was transferred to the 3rd Karabiner (Light Infantry), by which time he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant.
During the period 7th – 13th May 1940, the regiment was based in the Beerse – Arendonk area of northern Belgium, moving to Ghent on the 18th, where the regiment was engaged in heavy fighting until the 24th May. The unit then made a fighting withdrawal to the Leie River near Kortrijk, before ending up trapped between Oostkamp and Bruges.
The uniform consists of a Model 35 NCO's tunic which carries the shoulder boards and collar patches of the 3rd Karabiner regiment and the diagonal bar on the sleeve indicates the rank of Sergeant. The Model 31 Adrian helmet is worn featuring a lion badge plate. The brown leather field equipment comprises an NCO issue belt, support straps and Mauser ammunition pouches of either Belgian manufacture, or of WW1 German origin. The gas mask is the Model 31 version manufactured by Pirelli.

Sergeant Segers had received leave and was returning home on the 10th May when the Germans invaded Belgium. As was customary when on leave, he was in service dress rather than his battle dress. At the train station he received a message to re-join his regiment, although due to the confused military situation, he was initially unable to do so. As a result, still in his service dress, he made contact with and fought alongside other formations of Belgian Line Infantry in the battles across Belgium. He was eventually able to link up with his own unit on the retreat to Ghent and like the rest of his unit, was eventually captured near Bruges.

To view Belgian Army field kit, click here.

To view some Belgian Army soft caps, click here.

Back

This website may use Cookies
This website may use Cookies in order to work better. At anytime you can disable or manage it in your browser's settings. Using our website, means you agree with Cookies usage.

OK, I understand or More Info
Cookies Information
This website may use Cookies in order to work better. At anytime you can disable or manage it in your browser's settings. Using our website, means you agree with Cookies usage.
OK, I understand