Nazi Propaganda

 Deutscher Kleinempfaenger DKE 38 Radio

 


 





The name means "German small radio" and the '38' signifies 1938, the year of initial manufacture. Using only two tubes, it was an extremely simple design and therefore cheap, so that as many Germans as possible could buy one. It cost only 35 Reichsmarks; roughly one week's wages for an average worker of that day.
This was a propaganda radio, in short. Germans nicknamed this set Goebbels' Schnauze (Goebbels' snout), referring to the Minister of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, whose voice was often heard over the airwaves. The Nazis used radio propaganda extensively in the 1930s and 40s in an effort to control the German population.





The radio was also only designed to receive long-wave and medium-wave transmissions, which were the wavelengths typically used for regional and national broadcasting in Germany and other countries. The absence of short-wave functionality was intended to prevent owners listening to 'subversive' short-wave foreign broadcasts; short-wave being a better medium for longer-distance transmission from countries such as Britain.


Listening to foreign broadcasts was, in fact, forbidden by law. However, many enterprising owners were able to tune into medium and long-wave broadcasts of foreign countries by utilising a long antenna and a high degree of patience, especially at night, when radio waves propagate well.


To view our VE 301 DYN GW, click here. 

To view a website dedicated to the music and propaganda of Nazi Germany, click here.


Illustrierter Beobachter (Illustrated Observer) (Below)

This was the illustrated propaganda magazine of the Nazi Party, published between 1926 and 1945. The editor, Hermann Esser, was one of the founding members of the Party. Suffice to say this publication expressed and promoted the most radical views and rhetoric of one of the most extreme political dictatorships the world has ever seen.

This particular magazine is a 'Sondernummer', or special edition, entitled 'England's Schuld' (England's Guilt). It was published shortly after the outbreak of WW2 and carries an address from Josef Goebbels, the German Propaganda Minister, blaming Imperial Britain for starting the war and wanting to destroy Nazi Germany to preserve its status in the world. The cover illustration shows a British soldier of the Empire (with distinctly Jewish features) sitting in a sedan chair being carried by his 'chained' Chinese, Indian and African slaves.




German propaganda magazines from 1939 – titled 'France's Guilt'. The magazine cover depicts the Nazi view of the state of decay of the French nation. The symbolism used is distinctly racist, using racial and class stereotypes in the shape of French colonial troops, a Jewish banker / businessman and a French General standing over the ruins of France. If the allied nations were in any doubt as to what they were fighting against, this type of vulgar propaganda would have dispelled any misconceptions.

To discover about the Deutschland Erwacht book, click here.

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