Personal Account R A Hague

R A Hague

I did not take off my boots for a full month. We had been run out of France to Boulogne and up to Dunkirk. Our convoy was broken up before we arrived at the docks by French civilians and I was offered 1,000 Francs if I could get anyone over to England, of course that was out of the question.

The day before we retreated from Boulogne our Major asked for volunteers to go out to one of our D.F. Stations, as we had several of our operators there. We learned that two land mines had been dropped near the Station, one blew up, but the other could not be found. We looked about until I spotted it caught up in the trees. The moment I shouted that it had been found, our Major said "bring your bloody self out of it", not very nice when one had volunteered to find the mine.

Dunkirk was an inferno with fire and smoke as one of the fuel dumps had been bombed and it went on burning for days and nights. It was surprising how we stood up to it all, whether you stood up to the bullets and the bomb splinters or threw yourself down flat. I myself lay in the gutter as shrapnel flew everywhere. One could have been torn to pieces by the shrapnel. I was one of the many who got away on a Sunday afternoon on the 26th May 1940 and only in a fishing smack at that. Bombs dropped all around us but we managed to get to Dover where we encountered a bombing raid on the docks and railway station. We were left in the boat for two hours, before going to the station, where we were given tea and cakes.


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